Kelley Blue Book Patrol value

Collection of Patrol sales data

Postby RiverPatrol » Thu Jan 21, 2016 4:07 pm

Some of you might know what the Kelley Blue Book is. Anyone that has worked in the automotive industry should know. The Kelley Blue Book is the official guide to car, truck and motorcycle values. This is what dealerships will use to determine the value of your vehicle when you trade it in. This is the basis for determining the value of your vehicle when you sell it retail.

What many people don't realize is that Kelley Blue Book also publishes a 'Guide for Early Model Cars'. This is for cars and trucks from 1946 - 1995. It's the Collector's Edition. Patrols are listed in this guide, which is updated twice a year. Thanks to Urban60 for bringing this to my attention a few years ago.

Normally the Kelley Blue Book provides a Wholesale and a Retail value, for trade-ins or private sales. The Guide for Early Model Cars gives values for the condition of the vehicle, using three categories: Fair, Good and Excellent. This is what they publish as their Guide to Condition:

FAIR
Running car, needs complete cosmetic and some mechanical restoration. No parts missing. May have some repairable rust. A 4 rating. (1 being best.)

GOOD
Clean original, or older restoration, showing normal wear and tear. Drives well. No rust. A 2 to 3 rating. (1 being best.)

EXCELLENT
Beautiful original condition, or excellent restoration, showing no wear. Excellent condition for a car that is or can be actually driven on the street. A "1 minus" rating. (1 being best.)

Certain equipment and packages, exceptionally low mileage cars in excellent original condition, or cars completely restored to "show" quality that are trailered, may increase values shown substantially.

We do not address Customized Cars or Street Rods.

These values are the opinion of the staff and management of Kelley Blue Book and are derived at after careful study of information we deem reliable; however, we assume no responsibilities for errors or omissions.



The book is updated twice a year. I will update this table with the current published value as long as I can maintain a subscription. They actually list Patrols for the years 1965, 1966 - 1967 and 1968 - 1969, but since the values of all of them are the same I will only list one year. You can see that the values do increase over time. You must remember that their are circumstances that can add and detract from these values. I have included the FAQs that explain these from the Kelley Blue Book below. So, when someone appears to be a "purist", there is good reason: it all has to do with the value of the vehicle as an industry standard, not just their opinion.






KBB EditionBody TypeFairGoodExcellent
July-December 2016NISSAN PATROL 4WD - 6Cyl.99001710027200
January-June 2016NISSAN PATROL 4WD - 6Cyl.98001690026900
July-December 2015NISSAN PATROL 4WD - 6 Cyl.98001690026900
July-December 2013NISSAN PATROL 4WD - 6 Cyl.82001410022400



These are the FAQs published within the Kelley Blue Book. Note that some pertain to aspects that can affect the value of the vehicle.


Why is there a large gap between the "Fair" and "Excellent" values on some vehicles?
Condition is a key factor for collector vehicles. When determining the difference in values between conditions, factors such as restoration costs and market demand are important. Some models require more time and money to restore. Considerations like original parts availability, reproduction parts costs, and overall market demand, among others, go into this valuation. Additionally, certain vehicles, such as exotics or rarer body styles, are worth more when in excellent condition than in fair condition.

Why do some vehicle values increase while others decrease?
The market sets the price on collector cars, and Kelley Blue Book monitors market and auction movement to track this. We track all models and market activity and set the increases or decreases found in this guide accordingly. This is due in part to supply and demand as well as economic conditions.

What is the difference between the terms "original" and "restored"?
"Original" should indicate that vehicles have not been restored by any means, including paint, soft trim, drivetrain changes, etc. These vehicles are also often referred to as "survivors". "Restored" vehicles should indicate that they have been taken back to their "as built" condition, with an eye toward authenticity. For collectors, a well maintained "original" vehicle may have more value than a "restored" one.

What does "matching numbers" mean?
During production, some manufacturers placed identification numbers on various components of the drivetrain, such as engine block, transmission, or rear axle. A vehicle with all those original items helps verify its heritage and authenticity, which can add greatly to its overall desirability as a collector car and thus its value.

What does "date coded" mean?
This usually applies to high-performance vehicles that have either had the engine or other drivetrain components changed due to irreparable damage to the original parts. "Date coded" indicates that the block has markings showing it was built about the same time or era as the vehicle it was placed in. Another term often used is a "warranty block", indicating the original engine was replaced under warranty from the same period as the original. Both of these tend to detract from a vehicle's value.

Can the color of a vehicle affect its value, and if so, does Kelley Blue Book take this into consideration?
Often manufactures have premium paint colors that cost more at the time of original purchase. This can have an effect on values as collector cars, especially if they have been restored to original appearance. However, this is nearly impossible to accurately monitor and is therefore not accounted for in this guide. Many collectors do prefer having vehicles that match original paint and trim codes.

How can the Early Model Guide be used to determine the value of "custom", "modified", or "resto-mod" vehicles?
Because each of these builds is unique, establishing values of vehicles that have been altered from original manufacturer specifications would require independent inspection and appraisal. However, this guide can be used as a starting point to determine market conditions and any trends affecting these cars. This also applies to otherwise original vehicles with color or engine upgrades, for instance.

What type of documentation is available to help determine a vehicle's background or history?
Several car manufactures and private concerns offer help in decoding data and build plates and, through the serial numbers, can sometimes determine the originally installed engine or transmission as well as accessories, colors, or trims. However, for most older cars, this information has been lost. Having original owner's documents, invoices, price stickers, or build sheets can be of major importance to a vehicle's value and should be protected and preserved.
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Postby ratpatrol66 » Fri Feb 12, 2016 3:02 am

Thank You for finally opening this up! I'm really amazed that Patrols show in KBB? Great to see they are getting a recognized.
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Postby PATMY69 » Wed Dec 19, 2018 9:55 am

Thank you for this info! I always wonder how it valued on a KBB if at all. Now I can understand the meaning behind the sales I have seen lately.

Question: When you have a super excellent patrol for sale(20 K or more), does it take away from the value if the interior color is different from the exterior? I personally think that takes away from the niceness. It seems to happen a lot.

I personally am dis...appointed (Just to be nice)when the vehicle is in such beautiful shape and great color and then you get a taste of the interior color and/or the engine bay and it is a different color. My thought is Arg! Why?

My biggest apologeeze to anyone I have offended with this Question. (that is what is done nowadays)
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Postby RiverPatrol » Wed Dec 19, 2018 10:45 am

PATMY69 wrote:My biggest apologeeze to anyone I have offended with this Question. (that is what is done nowadays)


No problem, no snowflakes here. :D

The interior color would only detract if it wasn't correct for the year. Up until '68 the interior color, under the hood, under the fenders was gray instead of body color, unless it was a soft top, then interior etc. would match the body. So sometimes it's supposed to be different.
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Postby PATMY69 » Thu Dec 20, 2018 9:42 am

Thanks for that insight!
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